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Life on the Assembly Line and in a Coach Building Department

Pnahard

Views of automobile factories and assembly lines are of interest as they always show a part of the story behind the vehicle that was manufactured there. This pair of images was taken some thirty years apart and show two different ends of the business. Above we see the assembly line and workshop used for Panhard et Levassor engines in Paris, France during February of 1917.

Below is a coachbuilding shop at an unknown establishment that perhaps was located in England. The considerable number of English wheels used for panel-forming and the wooden bucks necessary for checking panel shape in the shop are both of interest. The metal-shaping machines were made by George Kendrick LTD in Birmingham. We have a feeling that the body shells being worked on may be for the Bristol 401 or 403. You can learn the interesting history of Bristol Cars Limited here.

We ask our readers to add anything they can that will tell us more about the photos. The top photo came to us via Isabelle Bracquemond and is courtesy of ecpad. The bottom photo is via Voccor Tools.

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This entry was posted in Auto photos 1921 - 1942, Auto photos 1946 - 1965 and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Life on the Assembly Line and in a Coach Building Department

  1. David Clark says:

    I’m going with Jensen for the coach building shop. The Jensen brothers built their own cars such as the Interceptors, (which these look similar to) but they also took in work for others. Austin Healey body shells were built there before being trucked to Longbridge, or later on to Abingdon where they went down the assembly lines alongside various MG’s.

    Jensen also built the Volvo P18 bodies initially, I believe.

    • David, Thanks for throwing Jenson into the realm of possible builders of these cars. Can you direct us to a photo source that we can confirm what model of Jenson it could be?

      It would be great to be able to positively ID these body shells.

  2. Richard Chaffe says:

    They are Bristol 401′s.

  3. Ed Hyman says:

    I vote Bristol 401.

  4. Jean-Claude Dusse says:

    They are Bristols either 401 or 403 possibly in their factory at Filton.

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