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The Chantilly Arts & Elegance Concours 2014

The Chantilly Arts & Elegance Concours was held on September 7, 2014, at the Domaine de Chantilly, North of Paris, France. This first time event celebrated the return to France of a world-class Concours d’Elegance, an event that originated in the country back in the horse and carriage days in the late 17th century. The combination of some of the finest cars in the world attending, the spectacular setting, and the excellent work by the organizer Peter Auto resulted in an outstanding event.

The cars on exhibit were all hand picked and came from some of the best collections in the world. The display of the vehicles was divided between two large Royal Gardens, each containing five pools and fountains; between the Gardens is a body of water supplied by the Grand Canal of Chantilly. The location allows for the display to be spread out and results in an exceptional viewing experience. Complementing the cars were both vintage steam and powerboats giving rides on the waterways, and hot-air balloons that allowed visitors to see the sights from the air.

American collector Peter Mullin’s spectacular 1937 Delahaye 135 M Cabriolet, with coachwork by Figoni & Falaschi took the first Best of Show win. Shown (below) are many of the other pre-war class winners in more than two-dozen images by Pavel Novitski of Novitski Classics. More information can be found at the Chantilly Arts & Elegance Concours. At the bottom of the post is a twenty-five minute video produced for the organizers that gives you an excellent overview of this outstanding event.

1937 Delahaye 135 M Cabriolet, with coachwork by Figoni & Falaschi.

Best of Show winning 1937 Delahaye 135 M Cabriolet, with coachwork by Figoni & Falaschi.

1932 Alfa Romeo 8C Monza

1932 Alfa Romeo 8C Monza.

1930 Bugatti Type 41 Royale Coupe Napoleon

1930 Bugatti Type 41 Royale Coupe Napoleon.

1930 Bugatti Type 41 Royale Coupe Napoleon.

1930 Bugatti Type 41 Royale Coupe Napoleon.

1932 Maserati V4 Zagato Sport Spider by Zagato

1932 Maserati V4 Zagato Sport Spider by Zagato.

1932 Maserati V4 Zagato Sport Spider by Zagato

1932 Maserati V4 Zagato Sport Spider by Zagato.

1933 Bugatti Type 55 Figoni et Falaschi Roadster

1933 Bugatti Type 55 Roadster.

1933 Bugatti Type 55 Figoni et Falaschi Roadster

1933 Bugatti Type 55 Roadster.

Vintage Bentleys

Vintage Bentleys.

1930 Bentley Speed Six Old Number 2

1930 Bentley Speed Six Old Number 2.

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1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Pourtout Coupe. Look for a feature article on this car soon.

1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Figoni et Falaschi Coupe

1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Figoni et Falaschi Coupe.

1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Figoni et Falaschi Coupe

1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Figoni et Falaschi Coupe.

1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Figoni et Falaschi Coupe

1939 Talbot Lago T150 C SS Figoni et Falaschi Coupe.

1928 Bugatti T40 ‘Lidia’

1928 Bugatti T40 Lidia.

1932 Bugatti Type 50

1932 Bugatti Type 50.

1932 Bugatti Type 50

1932 Bugatti Type 50.

1933 Mercedes-Benz 380 Roadster

1933 Mercedes-Benz 380 Roadster.

1933 Delage D8 S Pourtout Cabriolet

1933 Delage D8 S Pourtout Cabriolet.

1904 24-40 h.p. Delaugère & Clayette

1904 24-40 h.p. Delaugère & Clayette

1925 Bugatti Type 35

1925 Bugatti Type 35.

1933 Maserati 8CM

1933 Maserati 8CM.

1937 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante

1937 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante.

1936 Hispano-Suiza J12 Saoutchick Cabriolet

1936 Hispano-Suiza J12 Saoutchick Cabriolet.

 1937 Bugatti Type 57 S Atalante

1937 Bugatti Type 57 S Atalante.

 1937 Bugatti Type 57 S Atalante

The video (below) shows an overview of the Chantilly Arts & Elegance Concours, it is in the French language, but is professionally produced and well worth viewing. The production also covers the Tour L’Elegance and the gathering of over five-hundred other cars that attended the Luncheon on the Grass.

 

7 responses to “The Chantilly Arts & Elegance Concours 2014

  1. David, this is not at all meant to be a negative toward these gorgeous cars, but I have wondered if the ones like some of the Bugatti’s , the Maserati. and especially the Talbot Lago type cars handle as evil as our modern cars would with that front wheel “stance” ? I know that race cars now normally favor a top-out stance of the wheels, so these lovely pictures just got me to thinking….. and that can be dangerous, I know, ha ! Thank you all so much for this site, it’s one of my everyday/ first things to do. John

    • John, No not really they generally handle well. What you are referring to is called positive camber and it was common on many pre-WWII cars. I believe it was because the roads of the day had a sharper crown back then and this positive camber would in effect keep the wheel and tire perpendicular to the road surface.

      Todays racing cars use the opposite – negative camber. Check here for a good explanation of all the basics of front wheel geometry: http://www.motor.com/article.asp?article_ID=552

  2. David, don’t know if you noticed, but I said “top out” when referencing the race cars. I of course meant the opposite (negative camber) and driving a very good handling 63 Austin Mini with 5″ Mini-Lite clones regularly, know this all too well. Thanks to you and Mr. Walker for the answers about the oldies though, that’s exactly what I wanted to know.
    We also have a stock 48 Anglia, and it seemed to be nearly “straight up” aligned until I put a little wider VW wheels with modern tires on it. Now it seems to handle and track SO much better, and with the tire and wheel off-set and width, looks just a tad negative. ….. No race car here though, ha !
    I also have a question, is there a way to receive a notice when other comments are made on items one has commented on ? Hemmings allows this, and it is neat to see others are still reading and commenting on older posts, (as well as sometimes quite useful). Thanks again, John

    • John, On our old format it was easy to see if anyone had let a comment as the number of comments was displayed at the end of the post.

      We are working on trying to find a way to display the number of replies a post gets and display it on the home page so you do not have to open the post to see if there are any new replies since you last looked at it.

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