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Parking Lot Series: Pearl Court, Newton Corner, Massachusetts

Newton Corner is one of several villages located around the suburban City of Newton, Massachusetts. The community is sited about seven miles west of the City of Boston, south of the City of Watertown, and the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90).

Today’s feature image dated is March 7, 1946 by the source, and contains the Pearl Court parking lot in Newton Corner. Behind the lot on the far-left is the Paramount Theatre, and the D.R. Handy & Co. Machine Shop is in the center of the photo.

All of the automobiles including one compact parked in the facility were of domestic manufacture and produced in the pre-war days. Due to high demand, it was quite difficult and expensive to find and purchase a new car early in 1946.

Share with us what you find of interest in the expandable photograph (below) courtesy of Digital Commonwealth.

18 responses to “Parking Lot Series: Pearl Court, Newton Corner, Massachusetts

  1. Have been to the movies there as a kid.Building knocked down around 1982 or ’83.
    Curious about the car to the right of machine shop?

  2. For those of us who don’t care for a lot of doors there seems to be plenty of two doors although several are a step or two up from base makes. Some years they outsold the fordors as the everyman’s affordable transportation. I particularly like those two ’36 Pontiacs, third row back.

  3. Besides the cars from the past, I noticed another thing from the past-clothes hanging on the wash lines at two different homes.

  4. The earliest car I see doesn’t show enough to be identified. From the little bit showing on the (viewer’s) left edge of the photo, it appears to be an about ’31/’32 two door sedan. The next earliest, way in the back near the center of the picture, appears to be an about ’34/’35 sedan, with no hood or radiator on it, and maybe no engine. Maybe the engine is inside the machine shop being rebuilt?
    There are a few other newer style ’35/’36 cars, and most cars appear to be from about ’37 to ’40. A few cars I think I could identify with some effort, but none that jump out at me.

  5. Most striking are the number of two door ‘coach’ sedans among the group. Although largely forgotten now, that body style was the best seller for most lower-priced nameplates in the pre-war era. It provided all the passenger capacity of the four door sedan for less money as well as the safety of no chance for youngsters to accidently open a rear door at speed.

  6. Most striking are the number of two door ‘coach’ sedans among the group. Although largely forgotten now, that body style was the best seller for most lower-priced nameplates in the pre-war era. It provided all the passenger capacity of the four door sedan for less money as well as the safety of no chance for youngsters to accidentally open a rear door at speed.

  7. Plenty of dried-on road salt in evidence. Those poor old cars were not long for this world in that environment

  8. Those are some goodly sized houses in this neighborhood, the machine shop not withstanding, since it appears to be a converted coach house or stable. I do wonder what possessed them to add the bay window tho.

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