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Car Trunk Filled with Bootleg Whiskey and Dollar Day Bargains

The one surefire way for a Chamber of Commerce or a shopping organization in a town or city to boost merchants sales is to promote a day where discounts on goods are offered. Today’s lead image dated by the source to February 8, 1966, was taken in Greenville, NC on “Dollar Day” and shows a police officer directing traffic on the street in the shopping district filled with vehicles and bargain hunters attending the sales event.

  • “Dollar Day” traffic on February 8, 1966 in Greenville, NC.

The second photo (below) dated to December 21, 1964, by the source contains a 1950s Pontiac sedan with a trunk load of bottles filled with moonshine seized by police in the Greenville, NC area. The goods are packed in boxes and separated by pieces of cardboard to keep the glass from making noise by clinking together, which is a sure sign of a car and driver hauling the illegal and not taxed alcohol.

Getting caught hauling “shine” which is rare-to-non-existent today is a Federal offense and a felony punishable by up to five years in prison, and a fine of up to $10,000, or both. It is also likely that the vehicle used is seized and becomes the property of the Federal government.

Share with us what you find of interest in the photographs courtesy of DigitalNC.

  • Mid-1950s Pontiac sedan with a trunk load of bottles filled with moonshine seized after an arrest.

25 responses to “Car Trunk Filled with Bootleg Whiskey and Dollar Day Bargains

  1. In the lead photograph, just beyond the traffic officer, is a four-door 1953 PLYMOUTH Savoy, missing its driver’s side doors’ moldings.

  2. Behind the ’63 Impala Sport Sean on the left, a ’65 Buick Wildcat 4-door Hardtop (the ’65 has a slightly greater upward turn on the leading edge of the bumper ends and the Wildcat’s 3-tined rake trim behind the front wheel vs a ’66 Wildcat’s blocky parallelogram “vent” ) followed by a ’66 Chevy.
    Leading the pack down the street, a ’54 Plymouth Belvedere 4-door, maybe a ’66 Ford Galaxie 500 or LTD and then a pair of ’65 or ’66 Pontiacs, followed by another ’63 Chevy

  3. Hi! Two thoughts, please.

    1) Can anyone make out the foreign car with its tail sticking out in traffic in the first photo? Is it a FIAT?

    2) The bottom photo was taken in 1962 or later. There’s a 63 Ford police car in the background.

    Thanks, David for all you do.

    • Volvo 144 1964 or so. One of the ones they stacked eight or ten high in their safetyads. Has three of that series. Good cars and suprisingly quick for the day.

  4. Again in the lead photo, I see a ’57-’59 Mopar, though not a Plymouth. It could be a Chrysler or DeSoto but I suspect it may be a Dodge since they had less of an outward cant to their fins.
    Behind it, a ’56 Ford Fairlane, then a ’61 or ’62 full-size GM, likely a ’62 Pontiac with long, slender ornament on top of the fender and the prominent hooded extension of the fender over the headlights with chrome bezel. The headlight bulged outward more than the extension over them…unlike for instance, on a ’59 or ’60 Pontiac.
    Then a Chevy Apache, likely a ’63 or later if I detect an amber turn signal lens. Finally, as John Sullivan offered above, a Hillman Minx…likely a ’63 or ’64 Series V.

    • Hi Pat, just a matter of time before you found this site. I know Pat from Hemmings, and is a carspotting guru. Not much gets past Pat.

      • Hi, Howard, it’s very kind of you to say that, but I readily admit to making as many errors as anyone else…and I’m afraid, a quite a bit gets past me. Your talents in both car and especially truck spotting constantly amaze me. Thank you for your welcoming comments.
        For some years I had been looking at and greatly admiring the photos David posts, as well as enjoying reading the responses and, as you noted, only recently decided to join the others in this fun exercise of memory wringing and exchange of knowledge on so many related topics.
        I don’t know whether responding in here is the walking part…and doing the same in Hemmings is the chewing gum part, but I’ll try my best to do both.
        Again, thank you.

    • Actually the “Apache” would not be later than ’63. The wraparound windshield visible here stopped in ’63 and changed to a “conventional” windshield in ’64.

  5. The Ford at the stop bar behind the Hilman is a 66 model. The headlight bezel is rounded on the corners and bulges slightly on the sides. The 65 Ford had square corners and straight sides on the headlight bezels.

  6. The third car in the line in front of the policeman is a 65 or 66 Pontiac, probably a Bonneville as it has fender skirts on the rear wheels.

  7. “And there was thunder, thunder over thunder road
    Thunder was his engine, and white lightning was his
    Load
    There was moonshine, moonshine to quench the devil’s thirst
    The law they swore they’d get him, but the devil got
    Him first.”
    You’ll have to look up “The Ballad of” Thunder Road to avoid getting overwhelmed by Springsteen’s cheesy song of the same name. The absolute coolest dude of his (and maybe all) time, Robert Mitchum is the only guy I know who can flick a lit cigarette out the passenger side window of his car and hit the driver alongside in the neck. The movie theater audience positively erupted when he pulled off that stunt.

  8. I’ve previously expressed surprise at how often Hillmans appear in these photos. This one is a Series V or VI. They looked identical but the VI was a big improvement with 5 bearing engine and all-synchro gearbox.

    • The last of these variously named Rootes Audax medium sedans were well made but needed new engines the Arrow series never got one either..and Rooters slipped away…

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