“The First Aluminum Alloy Truck” The 1934 Fageol

This 1934 “Fageol Built” truck, according to the sign shown on it while on display, was “The First – Aluminum Alloy Truck”. The sign goes on to list a standard chassis weight at 12,375 lb., with the aluminum version coming in at 9480 lb., a savings of 2,895 lb. With the limited amount of power available for truck engines at the time, this was a big plus as it would allow that much extra payload to be carried, which would increase income for a trucking company.

The Fageol Brothers  first tried building the innovative car that we featured recently, but then turned to building trucks and tractors. In the early 1920s the brothers invented a new style of bus that was low to the ground, along with it featuring a wide track and called it the “Safety Coach”. It was much more resistant to roll-overs, than the conventional bus of the time, with a high center of gravity. In 1927 they left the company and formed the Twin Coach Company and manufactured buses in Ohio.

The Fageol truck was built up through to 1938 when production stopped and it was then bought by T. A. Peterman to build logging trucks on the West Coast. Soon the firm called “Peterbilt” after Peterman, branched out and also produced other types of high quality trucks, which remain in production until today. Photo courtesy of gdmey. 

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4 Responses to “The First Aluminum Alloy Truck” The 1934 Fageol

  1. John Byrd says:

    Those folks were so much into everything, it seems. I had a Fageol outboard motor they made using the Crosley engine as a basis. They must have been some really advanced thinkers and do’ers ! The truck looks really neat. Thanks for this site too, guys, always something new, and usually unknown to me . John

    • John, That is what we find very interesting about everything they did, they were innovators. When we can find photos of their later creations will will post more. Glad to here you enjoy The Old Motor.

  2. Rick McClerkin says:

    they even had a patent for a three wheeled vehicle around the turn of the century, similar to the benz vehicle of 1898. I have a magazine article with pictures of the patent

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