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A 1960s Standard Oil Station in St. Louis and a Mobilgas Station in Tulsa, OK

The circa 1962 photo was taken on the original Route 66 in Rock Hill, a suburb of St. Louis. This Standard Station and what appears to be an Eagle Stamp store was on Manchester Road and today it is a BP station. Taking the whole photo in (above) we can see five pump islands and a free Pepsi and hot dog sign for what may have been the opening.

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The the half enlargements (above) give you very good detail, on the (left) the newest car to be seen appears to be a Comet at the far pump. In the (right) photo in the back, up against the fence is a 1962 Chevrolet two-door hardtop. Tell us what else you can see and date in all the photos.

At 11th and Lewis in Tulsa, OK, we have a much quieter scene around a Mobiloil Station but plenty of liquids. On either side of the station can be seen two stores selling beer. And  high above the everything towers a Beatrice Foods Co., Meadow Gold milk and ice cream sign.

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In the enlargement on the (left hand) appears to be the Melody Lounge, with signs for Country Club in the window. Above the trafic signal can be seen a Phillips 66 sign of yet another station. The sign just under the beer sign in the (right hand) enlargement is for Keels Beer. Beatrice Foods Company was a major American food processing company whose assets were sold off in the late 1980s.

The photos are courtesy of Joe Sonderman who has a  Route 66 photo  collection that we have been posting in a series. He has written a very interesting book called  Get Your Pics on Route 66.

6 responses to “A 1960s Standard Oil Station in St. Louis and a Mobilgas Station in Tulsa, OK

  1. IN THE EARLY 60S STANDARD GAS STATION PHOTO, THERE IS A 58 CHEVY 4 DOOR GETTING ITS TANK FILLED PARKED BY THE TRIPLE EAGLE STAMPS BANNER. ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE GAS PUMPS IS WHAT LOOKS TO ME A 1963 FORD FULL SIZE STATION WAGON, THAT MIGHT BE THE NEWEST CAR IN THAT PHOTO.

  2. Was born in Tulsa and spent many summers there with my grandparents. If you go to Google Maps and Streetview that service station is gone but the building is still there on the SW corner of Lewis and 11th. It is now a discount flower shop.

  3. The Standard Station in Rock Hill is Leach Service. It was started by Tom Leach in 1949, and my dad started buying gas and taking his cars for service there in 1950. Tom eventually sold the station to his son Bob and I started taking my cars to Bob as well. Bob died a few years ago and his daughter Kellie is now running the station (February 2014). I still go there, as do my kids. The hot dog sign must have been a promotion, not the opening. Eagle Stamps were a local trading stamp in St. Louis, and Adams Dairy was a local dairy (the milk truck in the picture).

  4. The fake woody Ford station wagon Mark wrote about is a ’61. You can tell by the round taillight with the little fins on the sides. The ’62 was round but no fin, and the ’63 was more square and slab sided. The newest car I see is indeed the ’62 Comet (which had four headlights to set it off from the Falcon, to which was mechanically and body style similar) . I wish I could see the tail lights on that Chevy by the fence since that would ID the year. I get the feeling from the overhanging lip on the trunk it’s a ’61 but I really don’t have a good enough view to be sure.

    I agree with Dick on the station. This is not a Eagle Stamps store, although you’d be forgiven for thinking so with all the signs. This gas station just had a real tight marketing program with Eagle Stamps, and giving away triple stamps was the way to get mom to have dad stop there instead of a competitor’s station. This was very common until the mid-60’s, when the stamp companies started having antitrust problems. Green Stamps, Eagle Stamps and, slightly later, Top Value were the big three of the trading stamp business. The gas station lot is too worn for this to be a grand opening. I suspect that Pepsi also had a deal going with the gas station where they’d give the station free Pepsi and hot dogs in exchange for prominent display of their products. Too bad we can’t get a better view of the pumps or we’d likely see cases of Pepsi and quart bottles of the stuff stacked up there with a special price. All those pennants flying were seen at almost any gas station of any size back then, just for free Pepsi and hot dog day, or almost anything, really. You could get some real bargains on gas, Pepsi, and junk from Eagle Stamps if you were careful and didn’t get sucked into the money making part of the promotion. This was before the days of laws making dealers display prices, so you’d pull in, mom would want her stamps, the kids wanted hot dogs, and you’d pay a couple cents more a gallon that at the other guy, which paid for the Pepsi, hot dog, and stamps. Gas tanks back then were 20 or 25 gallons, so three cents more a gallon paid for a lot of hot dogs.

    Finally, I have no idea why I remember all this 53 years later.

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