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A 1910 Matheson

A very Nice Spooner and  Wells photo of a 1910 Matheson Silent Six Roadster is shown above. The photo below, shows the NYC Matheson show room located in between the Corbin and Alco salesrooms, both of which were very good company. Photos from the Robert C. Laurens collection courtesy of Alan Ballard.

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1907 Matheson Model D

The Matheson in our last post on the maker had grown up into a very handsome auto-mobile. They had adopted the Mercedes design, as did many other makers and when this photo was taken during 1907, they were producing two models. The first was a 123″ w.b. with a 35 hp four cylinder engine, which…

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The 1905 Matheson

A very interesting photo taken in the Matheson factory in Holyoke, MA, showing two cars side by side. The car on the right has their earlier style of radiator and the car on the left, showing evidence of much testing, is displaying the new design that they had chosen. For many more Matheson photos and…

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1905 Matheson Vanderbilt Cup Car

Tom Cooper posing in the 1905 version of the Matheson Vanderbilt Cup Racer which unfortunately did not make the field. They tried to make the race with two stock 40 hp cars, in a field comprised of thoroughbred racing cars that were in the elimination race for only five spots on the American team. Cooper’s car…

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1904 Matheson Revisited

Here we have another set of photos of the Holyoke Matheson that we have covered earlier along with some incredible photos of the engine. The primitive open gearing and the shaft for driving the single side-cam can be seen on the front of the engine. A couple of things to note in the second photo below…

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The 1904 Matheson Masterpiece

In April of 1903 the new Matheson Motor Car Company Ltd. was organized and this new company purchased the assets of the Holyoke Automobile Company and moved their operations from Grand Rapids, Michigan to Massachusetts. Charles Greuter became the chief mechanical engineer and at the advanced age of thirty-five he acquired the nickname of “Pop”….

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