An Entertaining & Informative Vintage Automobile Internet Magazine

INTRODUCING AMERICAN AUSTIN – Part II of the American Austin Bantam Story

By Robert D. Cunningham: Late in 1929, two American Austin prototypes were hand-crafted at Hayes Body Works in Grand Rapids, Michigan for display during the 1930 New York Auto Show. The Austins were 28 inches shorter, 16 inches narrower, and 1,200 pounds lighter than the lowest priced Ford Model A. The $445, two-passenger American Austin…

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The Kaiser-Frazer Go Round

In the post WWII era, the pent up demand for new automobiles encouraged newcomers to the industry to dive in with both feet. Industrialist Henry J. Kaiser was one whose wartime production experience made him especially well suited to take on the challenge. He had revolutionized the building of cargo ships during the war by…

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The Ever Popular 1932 Ford

            The very attractive and sporty new 1932 V-8 Roadster. The 1932 Ford was the long anticipated replacement for the Model A Ford. With the help of Edsel Ford’s keen eye for great automotive styling and the new V-8 engine, the 1932 Ford went on to become one of the most…

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1956 Chevrolet Assembly Line and a Futuristic GM Motorama Film

This photo shows the final inspection station on the Chevrolet assembly line, at the General Motors Fairfax Assembly Plant in Kansas City, Missouri, during 1956. The plant was next to the Fairfax Airport and was the former location of the North American Bomber Production Plant, where the B-25 Mitchell was manufactured during World War II. GM bought the former North…

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Ben Harper and W.S. Allen Run Coast to Coast, on Coast Tires

Ben Harper must have been one very determined individual, as he prepared and converted this 1913 Hudson on the third floor of a U.S. Navy warehouse in San Francisco. To get the car up to the third floor of the building, he tied a rope to the front axle of the car and used the…

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Henry Ford’s Stubbornness in the late 1930s

The three photos shown here demonstrate the lengths that the Ford Motor Company had to go to in the late 1930s because of Henry Ford’s stubborn-ness. He was insistent that the Ford car stay with mechanical brakes, long after most all other firms had changed over to hydraulic brakes. Even his son Edsel Ford could…

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Workers on the factory floor in the Nash Plant in the 1950s

This batch of photos shows workers on the factory floor of the Nash plant at close to the end of the Nash production run. A few of the photos may possibly be from after the change over to the Rambler name plate. The photos brought to mind a book titled Rivethead, which we read a few years back….

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Before and After – The Sad Story of the Packard Plant

The Packard Motor Car Company Plant, in Detroit, Michigan, (seen above) was for a long time, one of the grandest examples of an automobile factory in the world. The company moved into its first new and modern  Albert Kahn designed, reinforced concrete building on East Grand Blvd. in Detroit during 1903 – 1904. After that…

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*Updated* A Packard Single-Six and a Stevens Salient-Six in Detroit

*Update* At the bottom of the post. A pair of sporty cars and gentleman are seen here posing here with a Stevens Salient-Six roadster on the left and a Packard roadster. After spending a bit of time enlarging the photo it was found that it appears to be a brand new 1921-1923 Packard Single-Six, that is…

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